Clonfert Cathedral

Clonfert Cathedral

Clonfert Cathedral is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Clonfert, County Galway in Ireland. The original monastery was founded here by Saint Brendan in 563 and it is here that the great navigating saint is buried. The monastery at Clonfert became one of Ireland's foremost monastic schools, and the launching point of great missionary endeavour throughout Europe. At one time it had as many as 3000 brothers and endured until the 16th century. During the reign of Elizabeth I of England, it was proposed to found a university there, but the proposal was rejected and the university was later established in Dublin.
The earliest part of the church dates back to around 1180. Its doorway is the crowning achievement of Hiberno-Romanesque style. It is in six orders, and has an amazing variety of motifs, animal heads, foliage, human heads etc. Above the doorway is a pointed hood enclosing triangles alternating with bizarre human heads, and below this is an arcade enclosing more human heads.
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Date:
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Photographer:
Robert Riddell
Clonfert Cathedral

Clonfert Cathedral

Clonfert Cathedral is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Clonfert, County Galway in Ireland. The original monastery was founded here by Saint Brendan in 563 and it is here that the great navigating saint is buried. The monastery at Clonfert became one of Ireland's foremost monastic schools, and the launching point of great missionary endeavour throughout Europe. At one time it had as many as 3000 brothers and endured until the 16th century. During the reign of Elizabeth I of England, it was proposed to found a university there, but the proposal was rejected and the university was later established in Dublin.
The earliest part of the church dates back to around 1180. Its doorway is the crowning achievement of Hiberno-Romanesque style. It is in six orders, and has an amazing variety of motifs, animal heads, foliage, human heads etc. Above the doorway is a pointed hood enclosing triangles alternating with bizarre human heads, and below this is an arcade enclosing more human heads.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Robert Riddell